Copy Famous Paintings – Franz Marc

franz-marc

What is it?

A painting, Horse in a Landscape”, 1910 by Franz Marc

How  was this painting done?

This painting was completed in oils on canvas.  ‘Horse In Landscape” is an early work where Marc (inspired by Wassily Kandinsky) experiments with colour.   Here we see a red horse with a blue mane and tail looking over a landscape defined by yellow, red, green and blue areas. The horse is standing with its back to the observer, so is seen from viewers’ eyes.

Marc took a Cubist approach in the display and creation of the animals he painted.   He approached the painting simply by focusing on the animal and raw emotion rather than drawing in from external factors like background. Rendering the subject realistically was not Marc’s concern.

Why should we care?

When Marc was 20 years old he began to study at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich and eventually became a key figure in the German Expressionist movement.  Marc created art that increasingly, was stark and abstract in nature.  At age 34 and having been drafted into the army to fight in WWI, Marc enjoyed painting tarpaulins for military camouflage. Sadly, Marc was killed by a shell splinter in 1916.

As a young man whose life was lost needlessly in war, we honour Franz Marc and can only imagine what paintings he may have produced had he lived to old age.  The shadow of lives lost in war hovers over us still and we are indebted to artists like Marc. His paintings, particularly the brushstrokes, subject matter. abstraction and colour have left timeless memories for us to enjoy.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

In “Promenade”, 1913 and Tightrope Walker”, 1914 by August Macke we see a similar blend of Cubism, colour, distortion and form used to express emotions and feelings. 

Robert Delaunay, whose use of colour, design,  Futurist  and Cubist methods was also a major influence on Marc’s work.  This can be seen in The Rainbow”, 1913.  Delaunay makes a clear statement by using colour and form to describe his joy upon seeing a rainbow.  His primary concern is with expressing emotion, feelings and mood.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself. There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the colour you put down

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing with the crayon first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

0801-2016-0140701-2016-001

 

Franz Marc

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

 

 

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Copy Famous Paintings – Gabrielle Münter

gabrielle-munter-yavlensky-and-verevkin-1908

What is it?

A painting,“Yavlensky and Verevkin”, 1908 by German artist, Gabrielle Münter

How  was this painting done?

This painting has color as the star of the show.  Münter uses a number of very unusual, carefully mixed, tertiary blues, greens, yellows, and pinks. The composition and forms are very flat and the colors are muted and suggestive. The figures are as abstract as the landscape with the brightly coloured hat of the lady sitting centrally within a triangle of background clouds. The impression is one of a summer’s day in the mountains.

Even though Münter’s palette was bright, great sadness is reflected in her paintings.  Münter studied with the Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky and the relationship progressed from friendship to love affair. Kandinsky was married for fifteen years while he was in a relationship with Münter. Later and with WWI imminent,  Kandinsky fled to Russia and  married a recent acquaintance in Moscow.  These events affected Münter’s art.

Why should we care?

Münter had a life of mixed blessings.  Sadly, both her parents died before she turned 21.  To  Münter’s benefit, she was left with a substantial inheritance and was then able to devote her life to painting.  The artist was repeatedly refused enrollment in the German art academies because of her gender.

With persistence, passion and the financial security of her inheritance, Münter was eventually able to learn from the best teachers.  Münter proved she was able to paint as well as the men in the Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group of which she was a member.

Münter is a great example to us all.  With persistence, passion and despite the ups and downs of life, she achieved what seemed impossible for a woman at the time.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Münter’s paintings show the influence of Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin and Henri Matisse.  Similarities can also be seen in “Blauer Berg”, 1910 and “Landscaftstudie – Dorfstrasse”, 1908 by Alexej von Jawlensky.  The strong influence of Russian artists and Der Blaue Reiter members, von Jawlensky and Kandinsky is evident in Münter paintings done in the early 1900s.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

1212-2016-0111212-2016-038

Original image from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/gabrielemunter.php

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Wassily Kandinsky

houses-in-munich-kandinsky

What is it?

A painting, “Houses in Munich“, 1908 by Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky

How was this painting done?

Kandinsky blocked in the larger areas in bright colours and then touched up these areas with different tones of those same colours at the end.  The result is a patchwork of bright colours which both convey the emotions of the artist and make a picture.

The most striking effect in this painting is the orange sky which gives the feeling of a sunset throwing reflected light on the brightened buildings.   Kandinsky paints the foreground in warm colours to move the cool coloured buildings behind it.

Why Should We Care?

Kandinsky set out to convey universal human emotions and ideas by using blocks of vibrant colour.  His work became more and more abstract in order to transcend cultural and physical boundaries.

Kandinsky believed musicians could evoke images in listeners’ minds merely with sounds.  He also believed the reverse, that artists could evoke sounds and emotions in the viewers’ minds with images and colour. This was new and controversial thinking at the time and resulted in some scratching their head in bewilderment.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Similarities can be seen in Mont St Victoire, 1895 by Paul Cezanne.

Cezanne has divided the scene into blocks of colour although not quite as bright as the Kandinsky  painting above. Houses in Munich”  which was done 13 years later and is much more adventurous with colour.

American artist Hans Hoffman seems to have drawn heavily from Kandinsky’s early work and this can be seen in “Equipoise”, 1958.  Large blocks of colour push and pull the warm colours forward while the cooler colours recede giving depth to the painting.  The result is a confusion of shapes moving in space.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

2511-2016-0052311-2016-018

I also posted on how to paint watercolours to music after Wassily Kandinsky some years ago.

Image of original from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/work-85.php, accessed 13/11/2016