Copy Famous Portraits in Reverse – Alexj von Jawlensky

Jawlewnsy Young Girl with Peonies

What is it?

Painting “Young Girl with Peonies” by Alexj von Jawlensky

Image accessed 1/03/2018

In this painting I have reversed the colours by using their opposites on the colour wheel below.

color-wheel

 

How was this painting done?

German expressionist painters typically distorted colour, scale and space to convey their subjective feelings about what they saw. However, war scarred many of these artists for good. As a result, from 1915 onwards, German expressionism became a bitter protest movement as well as a style of modern art.

Exaggeration or distortion of lines, forms, and colours were just some of the techniques used by expressionists to convey their emotions, anxieties or neuroses.

Jawlensky combined elements of Russian icon painting and peasant art with the strong colours and outlines of the Fauves to create a distinctive, mystical expressionism.  He did, however, retain his typical Russian melancholy.

Why should we care?

Jawlensky can teach us a lot about the value of collaborating and working with our art buddies.

Between 1908 and 1910, Jawlensky spent summers in the Bavarian Alps with painters, Marianne von Werefkin, Gabrielle Munter and Wassily Kandinsky.  Through painting landscapes of their mountainous surroundings, they experimented with one another’s techniques and discussed many topics including art history.  After this time, Jawlewnsky turned increasingly to the expressive use of colour and form alone in his portraits. Jawlensky’s further collaborations with other artists who broke away from The New Artists’ Society in Munich went on to form the famous Der Blaue Reiter Group.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

“Portrait of Madame Matisse” (Green Stripe)”, 1905.  This work shows the bright colours   typical of The Fauves which influenced Jawlensky greatly.  Both Matisse and Jawlensky used colour to convey emotion.  Colour is the most significant element and focus of  “Young Girl with Peonies” (above) and “Portrait of Madame Matisse (Green Stripe).”

“Portrait of Marianne von Werefkin”, 1909, Gabrielle Munter.  Here, Munter has simplified the form and created clear colour contrasts similar to the technique applied in “Jawlensky’s “Girl with Peonies” (above).

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out”, have fun and recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two but don’t be concerned if  completing the painting over two days.
  • Tips on the Process
  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • paint in the background first
  • draw your painting with a small brush using a watery blend of blue.
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • The painting will not look great at the initial stages, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

If you would rather not use a grid for the drawing,  you may wish to copy from the first image below using a fine brush.

Go ahead!  Save yourself money by painting your own amazing pieces for your home.  You and your friends will be amazed at what you have achieved!

 

JawlenskyWalnut

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copy Famous Paintings – Claude Monet

Monets garden

Image accessed 4 December, 2017

What is it?

An oil painting, “Les Nymphéas” 1914-1926 by Claude Monet

How was this painting done?

This painting was done in an Impressionist technique using the “Alla Prima” style and with a chisel shaped brush. Monet painted the work all in one go, he did not wait for the paint to dry.   Monet used the “Le Petit Tache” method whereby the paint was not mixed on the palette. The artist dabbed different colours on the canvas. The colours blended with each other when looked at from a distance. It could be described as the “optical mixing of colour” and in this case, Monet has used ultramarine blue, lemon yellow, burnt sienna, cadmium red and titanium white.

This style was perfectly suited for Monet to literally shift the shimmers of his garden at Giverny.

Why should we care?

Impressionism was a real revolution in painting changing more in two decades than many artistic movements did in two centuries.

In 1872, in the French port city of Le Havre, 32-year-old Claude Monet made a painting that would give an art movement its name. Monet called his painting “Impression, Sunrise”. And an art movement was created.

The Impressionists broke all the formal academic rules — they used quick brush strokes, changed perspective and made their shadows out of colour, not black. Most of all the impressionists sought to capture light and most paintings, if not all, were done En plein air.  Scenes of ordinary life and glimpses of unpainted canvas were also characteristic of the Impressionist style.  All this was helped by the invention of tube paints, square brushes and portable easels making it easier to paint out of doors.

Monet sometimes painted ten canvases of the same subject at the same time just to capture the subject in different light throughout the day.

Where can I find other paintings like it?

You will see typical subject matter, quick brush strokes, colourful shadows and glimpses of bare canvas as in French Impressionism in these examples.

Le Boulevard Montmarte at Night”, 1897 by Camille Pissarro

Mount Sainte-Victoire view from Lauves”,
1904-6, by Paul Cezanne

In a French Garden”, 1873 by Frederick Childe Hassam

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out”, have fun and recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two but don’t be concerned if  completing the painting over two days.

Tips on the Process

 

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • paint in the background first
  • draw your painting with a small brush using a watery blend of blue.
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • The painting will not look great at the initial stages, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

It is easy to copy from my drawing below using a fine brush.

Otherwise, you could ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

Go ahead!  Save yourself money by painting your own amazing pieces for your home.  You and your friends will be amazed at what you have achieved!

 

 

2BF58479-7FD2-440B-9103-A7C841B4FF15

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Edvard Munch

Edvard_Munch_-_Madonna_-_Google_Art_Project

Image accessed November, 2017

What is it?

Painting, “Madonna“, 1894 by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch

How was this painting done?

Softly undulating lines create a kind of cyclical form reminiscent of an aura around the figure. The painting was done in layers of oil paint.  The layers of paint show through to the final colours.  It seems Munch’s colours start with a background of gold and orange.  The artist appears to blend this with a raw umber or payne’s gray to create the darker tones in subsequent layers.

Why Should We Care?

Due to a childhood of illness and death in his family, Munch had a preoccupation with themes of anxiety, emotional suffering, and human vulnerability.  In his art he tried to explain life and its meaning not only to himself, but to others.   Edvard Munch tried to help others clarify their lives.  He was the first European artist to do this.

Where can I find other paintings like this?

Edvard Munch was influenced by Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.  You can see this in Van Gogh’s “Girl in White” and Gauguin’s The Siesta

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Friedensreich Hundertwasser

hundertwasser-7

What is it?

This painting is a cropped piece of a larger work, Man find in Zahala”, 1975 by Austrian artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser

How was this painting done?

Man find in Zahala” was done in watercolour with spiral motifs, primitive forms, spectral colors, and repetitive patterns. Throughout his career Hundertwasser used the six spectral colors almost exclusively.  In this picture the forms are abstracted, simplified and embellished with colour.

Hundertwasser believed painting to be a religious experience.  It was his intention to offer his viewers a glimpse of paradise.  This painting is highly decorative as was typical of the style in Austria at the time.  .

Hundertwasser liked to be viewed as a “magician of vegetation” and he is true to form in this painting.

Why should we care?

We have to admire Hundertwasser for his unusual ability to turn his skills to many diverse projects.  He was multi-talented.  Not content to merely paint and make prints, he was also an architect without credentials who wrote manifestos, designed posters and stamps, and travelled the globe bringing construction projects to realization and collecting awards. He was also an outspoken proponent of many environmental and anti-nuclear causes. Hundertwasser is best known for his vibrantly-colored, opulently-decorated paintings, graphic works and contribution to printmaking techniques.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Hundertwasser’s early paintings were heavily influenced by the Vienna Secession tradition of Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. His works from 1949 through to 1953 also display close affinity with well-known paintings by Paul Klee. “Small Rhythmic Landscape”, 1920 by Paul Klee has the same dreamlike landscape theme with similar primitive forms and repetitive patterns to those seen in Hundertwasser’s paintings.

Hundertwasser was good friends with and influenced by Rene (Bro) Brault.  Similarities in their work can be seen in Paysage Vallonn”, (date not found).  Brault’s palette was totally different from Hundertwasser’s  yet their treatment of trees was almost identical.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself. There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the colour you put down

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing with the crayon first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy onto good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

 Hundertwasser’s style is displayed perfectly in this short video.

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Gabrielle Münter

gabrielle-munter-yavlensky-and-verevkin-1908

What is it?

A painting,“Yavlensky and Verevkin”, 1908 by German artist, Gabrielle Münter

How  was this painting done?

This painting has color as the star of the show.  Münter uses a number of very unusual, carefully mixed, tertiary blues, greens, yellows, and pinks. The composition and forms are very flat and the colors are muted and suggestive. The figures are as abstract as the landscape with the brightly coloured hat of the lady sitting centrally within a triangle of background clouds. The impression is one of a summer’s day in the mountains.

Even though Münter’s palette was bright, great sadness is reflected in her paintings.  Münter studied with the Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky and the relationship progressed from friendship to love affair. Kandinsky was married for fifteen years while he was in a relationship with Münter. Later and with WWI imminent,  Kandinsky fled to Russia and  married a recent acquaintance in Moscow.  These events affected Münter’s art.

Why should we care?

Münter had a life of mixed blessings.  Sadly, both her parents died before she turned 21.  To  Münter’s benefit, she was left with a substantial inheritance and was then able to devote her life to painting.  The artist was repeatedly refused enrollment in the German art academies because of her gender.

With persistence, passion and the financial security of her inheritance, Münter was eventually able to learn from the best teachers.  Münter proved she was able to paint as well as the men in the Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group of which she was a member.

Münter is a great example to us all.  With persistence, passion and despite the ups and downs of life, she achieved what seemed impossible for a woman at the time.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Münter’s paintings show the influence of Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin and Henri Matisse.  Similarities can also be seen in “Blauer Berg”, 1910 and “Landscaftstudie – Dorfstrasse”, 1908 by Alexej von Jawlensky.  The strong influence of Russian artists and Der Blaue Reiter members, von Jawlensky and Kandinsky is evident in Münter paintings done in the early 1900s.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

1212-2016-0111212-2016-038

Original image from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/gabrielemunter.php

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Wassily Kandinsky

houses-in-munich-kandinsky

What is it?

A painting, “Houses in Munich“, 1908 by Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky

How was this painting done?

Kandinsky blocked in the larger areas in bright colours and then touched up these areas with different tones of those same colours at the end.  The result is a patchwork of bright colours which both convey the emotions of the artist and make a picture.

The most striking effect in this painting is the orange sky which gives the feeling of a sunset throwing reflected light on the brightened buildings.   Kandinsky paints the foreground in warm colours to move the cool coloured buildings behind it.

Why Should We Care?

Kandinsky set out to convey universal human emotions and ideas by using blocks of vibrant colour.  His work became more and more abstract in order to transcend cultural and physical boundaries.

Kandinsky believed musicians could evoke images in listeners’ minds merely with sounds.  He also believed the reverse, that artists could evoke sounds and emotions in the viewers’ minds with images and colour. This was new and controversial thinking at the time and resulted in some scratching their head in bewilderment.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Similarities can be seen in Mont St Victoire, 1895 by Paul Cezanne.

Cezanne has divided the scene into blocks of colour although not quite as bright as the Kandinsky  painting above. Houses in Munich”  which was done 13 years later and is much more adventurous with colour.

American artist Hans Hoffman seems to have drawn heavily from Kandinsky’s early work and this can be seen in “Equipoise”, 1958.  Large blocks of colour push and pull the warm colours forward while the cooler colours recede giving depth to the painting.  The result is a confusion of shapes moving in space.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

2511-2016-0052311-2016-018

I also posted on how to paint watercolours to music after Wassily Kandinsky some years ago.

Image of original from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/work-85.php, accessed 13/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Egon Schiele

egon-schiele-ceramics

What is it?

Painting Ceramics“, 1918 by Austrian artist, Egon Schiele.

How was this painting done?

Schiele did this painting on paper with watercolours.  He used a black crayon to draw the outline of the objects.  This is a simple painting done in a loose and organic style.   Schiele restricted his colours and kept the painting uncluttered with a plain background which was typical of his style.  The result is an entirely pleasing composition of “less being more.”

Why Should We Care?

Schiele is a great example of an artist who followed his passion and was not molded by beliefs of what art should be as thought by others.

Schiele, Gustav Klimt and others chose to break away from the Academie of Fine Arts and the Kunstlerhaus  in 1897 and form the Vienna Secessionists.

This enabled Schiele the freedom to create  the raw, direct,  erotic and deeply psychological paintings he preferred. His striking sinuous lines, use of colour and method of leaving a drawing or painting unfinished had not been seen before.  We are therefore, the beneficiaries of Schiele’s rebelliousness.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

The patterning on the vases in Schiele’s “Ceramics”, although done much later, reflects the influence of Japanese art after the influx of Japanese goods and  prints flooded Europe from 1853.

Vincent van Gogh’s Still Life With Roses and Anemones.”, 1890 and “Vase with Daisies and Poppies”, 1890 also reflect the influence  of Japonisme.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

You can also check out how to create a naive landscape after Schiele using watercolours which I posted some time ago.  Related posts after Klimt, cropped versions of “The Kiss” and Mother and Childalso appear in this category.

Image accessed 13/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Amedeo Modigliani

woman_with_black_cravat-mogdiliani

What is it?

Woman with Black Cravat“, a painting done by Italian artist, Amedeo Modigliani in 1917

How was this painting done?

Modigliani used simple suggestive lines to create this portrait. He layered one colour on top of the other and it seems he commenced with a green undertone.  The secret to the vibrancy of this painting is the contrast between the warm colours such as red and orange in the face and the green throughout the painting.

Modigliani’s has stripped the initial drawing down to the bare essentials yet the personality of the sitter still shows.   Perhaps he was our first minimalist.  His portraits show the sitters with a mask-like appearance, distinctive almond eyes, pursed mouths, twisted noses, and elongated necks similar to African tribal masks.

Why should we care?

Modigliani despised his academic training and the art establishment of the time.  To go against the bourgeois, he developed his own unique style, one that could not be adequately categorized with other artists.  Modigliani lived a life of debauchery and rebelliousness.  His rebelliousness and use of hashish and absinthe created the genesis of Modigliani’s style which we enjoy so much today.

Where can I find more paintings like this?

It has been said that Modigliani inspired the paintings of Diego Riviera and Frida Khalo although I was unable to see this link.  It seems Modigliani painted in a unique style which inspired no known artists in Paris in the early 1900s.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the water soluble crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

This was my finished painting.  I will probably revisit this painting to make the brushstrokes much more impressionistic (especially in the background) as Mogdiliani has done.

1210-2016-007

A related post on Modigliani using oil crayons was created on this site some years ago.

Image of the original Modigliani painting accessed 01/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – André Derain

derain-pn

What is it?

Big Ben” painted by French artist, André Derain in 1908

How was this painting done?

André Derain applied paint in small dabs and dashes and he often used the combination of fiery oranges, yellows, greens and purple.  The effect is almost overpowering in its vibrant impact and shock of colour.

Why should we care?

In the early 20th century Derain was a founding member of a radical new movement in Paris called Fauvism.  Fauve painters such as Maurice de Vlaminck, Henri Matisse and André Derain used colour to enhance their work’s emotional power and appeal to the viewers’ senses. This new style was refreshing because it moved away from the dark and disturbing paintings being done at the time.  This use of colour had not been seen before and the Fauve painters thankfully opened the door to a new world of colour.

Where can I find more paintings like this?

There are many great examples of Fauve paintings to be enjoyed and you may even like to complete one.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • 3 soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry then proceed.
  • It is best to use bright colours directly from the tube for this exercise.
  • You will need to allow an hour or two because the painting looks best with lots of dabs of colour.
  • When drawing, try to position the sun in line with its reflection on the water.
  • There are no mistakes as the colours mix with the eye when the painting is viewed at a distance.

The Drawing Process

I did the drawing with my paintbrush as I went along.  Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

This was my finished painting.  Next time I will make it much brighter.

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big-ben

Image accessed 9/10/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Gustav Klimt

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What is it?

Mother and Child (a cropped version) by Austrian artist, Gustav Klimt.

How was the painting done?

The painting is done in flat blocks of colour with an emphasis on design with influences from the Japanese art of Ukiyo-e.  The mother and child are shown with soft lines and floral patterns.  Klimt has combined visual arts with ornament on canvas in oil with applied layers of gold leaf.

Why should we care?

Klimt went against his academic training to create his own eclectic, decorative, erotic and fantastic style.  He combined influences from the Arts and Craft MovementArt Nouveau and Japonisme.  There had been prior opposition to art which had been considered “decorative“.  Klimt was brave enough to challenge those beliefs and we today, are the lucky beneficiaries.

Where can I find more paintings like this?

You will see similar decorative patterning in the work of Egon Schiele and Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

This is my completed painting.  At one point, I painted over the drawing of the flowers and had to allow the painting to dry.  I then drew the flowers in again and painted them.

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klimt-mother-and-child

Image from http://www.illusionsgallery.com/Mother-Child-Klimt.html, accessed 12/10/2016