Copy Famous Paintings – Giorgio Morandi

Natura Morta”, Giorgio Morandi Circa. 1953

Giorgio Morandi was an Italian painter and printmaker. He was born in Bologna in 1890 and lived there all his life.  When his father died the family moved a couple of doors down where Morandi died in 1964. He escaped the summer heat in Grizzana, a town in the Apennines, now renamed Grizzana-Morandi. Otherwise he hardly ever left Bologna. He taught drawing, engraving and etching, always within walking distance of home. The artist would sometimes make day trips to Venice, Milan or Florence to see an exhibition, but only near the end of his life did he venture outside Italy, once to an exhibition in Switzerland, once to Paris.

His studio, also his bedroom, was in the flat he shared with his three sisters (all, like him, unmarried) and their mother. The room is often compared to a monk’s cell: an austere place of solitary contemplation.

How was this painting done?

Morandi has used a muted color palette, subdued subject matter, and quiet simplicity. He has painted familiar objects such as ceramic bowls and vases, bottles, pitchers, jugs and boxes. They are purposely stripped of any identifying marks such as labels. This lends the objects a sense of anonymity. They are objects that could easily come from anyone’s kitchen.

The objects to have a weighty, chunky appearance, minimal amount of shading and highlights and a matte surface appearance.

The artist uses a careful balance of subdued colors and subtle tones, the objects almost appearing flat, due to their lack of tonal range. The paintings enjoy an anonymous, silent quality. ageless quality, superceding time and place.

Morandi works in a painterly style, in which the brushstrokes are visible and become an important part of the composition. He is not concerned with hiding the brushstrokes to create a smooth surface appearance. Instead, he paints in such a way that the quality and handling of the paint have as much contemplative importance as the objects.

Why should we care?

Morandi is best known today for his beautifully contemplative still-life paintings. His imagery would influence numerous artists after him, including the Minimalists, who admired his pared-back aesthetic and emphasis on order, geometry and spacing. Morandi’s fame is worldwide, with examples of his work hanging in every major collection of modern art.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

“Still Life with Orange Peel”, 1955 by Richard Diebenkorn is a painting influenced by Morandi although painted in a colourful contemporary style.

“Still Life Seven Objects” by British artist Charles Hardaker is another painting is very much influenced by Morandi. The muted tones and anonymous silent quality of the objects are much in keeping with Morandi’s style of working.

“Still Life, New Studio” William Brooker 1974 The table is a notable feature in this quiet contemplative work.  In this painting, William Brooker seems to be very infuenced by Morandi’s muted tones. The objects have an ageless yet anonymous quality superseding time and space in typical Morandi style.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

 

 

Copy Famous Paintings – Claude Monet

Monets garden

Image accessed 4 December, 2017

What is it?

An oil painting, “Les Nymphéas” 1914-1926 by Claude Monet

How was this painting done?

This painting was done in an Impressionist technique using the “Alla Prima” style and with a chisel shaped brush. Monet painted the work all in one go, he did not wait for the paint to dry.   Monet used the “Le Petit Tache” method whereby the paint was not mixed on the palette. The artist dabbed different colours on the canvas. The colours blended with each other when looked at from a distance. It could be described as the “optical mixing of colour” and in this case, Monet has used ultramarine blue, lemon yellow, burnt sienna, cadmium red and titanium white.

This style was perfectly suited for Monet to literally shift the shimmers of his garden at Giverny.

Why should we care?

Impressionism was a real revolution in painting changing more in two decades than many artistic movements did in two centuries.

In 1872, in the French port city of Le Havre, 32-year-old Claude Monet made a painting that would give an art movement its name. Monet called his painting “Impression, Sunrise”. And an art movement was created.

The Impressionists broke all the formal academic rules — they used quick brush strokes, changed perspective and made their shadows out of colour, not black. Most of all the impressionists sought to capture light and most paintings, if not all, were done En plein air.  Scenes of ordinary life and glimpses of unpainted canvas were also characteristic of the Impressionist style.  All this was helped by the invention of tube paints, square brushes and portable easels making it easier to paint out of doors.

Monet sometimes painted ten canvases of the same subject at the same time just to capture the subject in different light throughout the day.

Where can I find other paintings like it?

You will see typical subject matter, quick brush strokes, colourful shadows and glimpses of bare canvas as in French Impressionism in these examples.

Le Boulevard Montmarte at Night”, 1897 by Camille Pissarro

Mount Sainte-Victoire view from Lauves”,
1904-6, by Paul Cezanne

In a French Garden”, 1873 by Frederick Childe Hassam

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out”, have fun and recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two but don’t be concerned if  completing the painting over two days.

Tips on the Process

 

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • paint in the background first
  • draw your painting with a small brush using a watery blend of blue.
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • The painting will not look great at the initial stages, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

It is easy to copy from my drawing below using a fine brush.

Otherwise, you could ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

Go ahead!  Save yourself money by painting your own amazing pieces for your home.  You and your friends will be amazed at what you have achieved!

 

 

2BF58479-7FD2-440B-9103-A7C841B4FF15

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Edvard Munch

Edvard_Munch_-_Madonna_-_Google_Art_Project

Image accessed November, 2017

What is it?

Painting, “Madonna“, 1894 by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch

How was this painting done?

Softly undulating lines create a kind of cyclical form reminiscent of an aura around the figure. The painting was done in layers of oil paint.  The layers of paint show through to the final colours.  It seems Munch’s colours start with a background of gold and orange.  The artist appears to blend this with a raw umber or payne’s gray to create the darker tones in subsequent layers.

Why Should We Care?

Due to a childhood of illness and death in his family, Munch had a preoccupation with themes of anxiety, emotional suffering, and human vulnerability.  In his art he tried to explain life and its meaning not only to himself, but to others.   Edvard Munch tried to help others clarify their lives.  He was the first European artist to do this.

Where can I find other paintings like this?

Edvard Munch was influenced by Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.  You can see this in Van Gogh’s “Girl in White” and Gauguin’s The Siesta

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Friedensreich Hundertwasser

hundertwasser-7

What is it?

This painting is a cropped piece of a larger work, Man find in Zahala”, 1975 by Austrian artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser

How was this painting done?

Man find in Zahala” was done in watercolour with spiral motifs, primitive forms, spectral colors, and repetitive patterns. Throughout his career Hundertwasser used the six spectral colors almost exclusively.  In this picture the forms are abstracted, simplified and embellished with colour.

Hundertwasser believed painting to be a religious experience.  It was his intention to offer his viewers a glimpse of paradise.  This painting is highly decorative as was typical of the style in Austria at the time.  .

Hundertwasser liked to be viewed as a “magician of vegetation” and he is true to form in this painting.

Why should we care?

We have to admire Hundertwasser for his unusual ability to turn his skills to many diverse projects.  He was multi-talented.  Not content to merely paint and make prints, he was also an architect without credentials who wrote manifestos, designed posters and stamps, and travelled the globe bringing construction projects to realization and collecting awards. He was also an outspoken proponent of many environmental and anti-nuclear causes. Hundertwasser is best known for his vibrantly-colored, opulently-decorated paintings, graphic works and contribution to printmaking techniques.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Hundertwasser’s early paintings were heavily influenced by the Vienna Secession tradition of Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. His works from 1949 through to 1953 also display close affinity with well-known paintings by Paul Klee. “Small Rhythmic Landscape”, 1920 by Paul Klee has the same dreamlike landscape theme with similar primitive forms and repetitive patterns to those seen in Hundertwasser’s paintings.

Hundertwasser was good friends with and influenced by Rene (Bro) Brault.  Similarities in their work can be seen in Paysage Vallonn”, (date not found).  Brault’s palette was totally different from Hundertwasser’s  yet their treatment of trees was almost identical.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself. There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the colour you put down

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing with the crayon first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy onto good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

 Hundertwasser’s style is displayed perfectly in this short video.

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Egon Schiele

egon-schiele-ceramics

What is it?

Painting Ceramics“, 1918 by Austrian artist, Egon Schiele.

How was this painting done?

Schiele did this painting on paper with watercolours.  He used a black crayon to draw the outline of the objects.  This is a simple painting done in a loose and organic style.   Schiele restricted his colours and kept the painting uncluttered with a plain background which was typical of his style.  The result is an entirely pleasing composition of “less being more.”

Why Should We Care?

Schiele is a great example of an artist who followed his passion and was not molded by beliefs of what art should be as thought by others.

Schiele, Gustav Klimt and others chose to break away from the Academie of Fine Arts and the Kunstlerhaus  in 1897 and form the Vienna Secessionists.

This enabled Schiele the freedom to create  the raw, direct,  erotic and deeply psychological paintings he preferred. His striking sinuous lines, use of colour and method of leaving a drawing or painting unfinished had not been seen before.  We are therefore, the beneficiaries of Schiele’s rebelliousness.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

The patterning on the vases in Schiele’s “Ceramics”, although done much later, reflects the influence of Japanese art after the influx of Japanese goods and  prints flooded Europe from 1853.

Vincent van Gogh’s Still Life With Roses and Anemones.”, 1890 and “Vase with Daisies and Poppies”, 1890 also reflect the influence  of Japonisme.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

You can also check out how to create a naive landscape after Schiele using watercolours which I posted some time ago.  Related posts after Klimt, cropped versions of “The Kiss” and Mother and Childalso appear in this category.

Image accessed 13/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Paul Klee

chosen-site-1940-paul-klee

What is it?

Chosen Site“, 1940, a painting by Swiss artist, Paul Klee

How was this painting done?

Paul Klee‘s style could be classed as geometric abstraction.

In this painting, the artist shows an indescribable mood.  He has done this by the use of contrasting complimentary colours, red and green.  The background recedes by the use of cool colours and Paul Klee has projected the buildings and foreground forward by using warm colours.  Klee uses colour to create perspective in the painting.

As Paul Klee enjoyed childrens’ art and created with them often, his work has a childlike nature.  Paul Klee’s artwork also shows a musicality which reflects his own childhood. The buildings are beautifully drawn with doodles and show a complete lack of structure.

Why should we care?

We can learn from Paul Klee because he was his own man.  He was confident to paint in the way he wanted despite what his contemporaries were doing at the time.  He drew from art movements such as Expressionism, Surrealism and Cubism yet retained his unique identity.  Paul Klee was inspired by the simplicity he had seen in children’s art and this gave his work so much power.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Klee’s style was influenced by American painter, William Baziotes especially in his moon landscapes and this painting called “Dwarf.”

Similiarities can also be seen in the paintings of Max Ernst and most especially in “Grätenwald” and “The Entire City.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

This is my finished painting.  I toned down the green background with a wash of cool red because I felt it was taking over.

2210 2016 003.JPG2310-2016-005

I created an earlier watercolour craft post on Paul Klee some years ago.

Image accessed 21/10/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Amedeo Modigliani

woman_with_black_cravat-mogdiliani

What is it?

Woman with Black Cravat“, a painting done by Italian artist, Amedeo Modigliani in 1917

How was this painting done?

Modigliani used simple suggestive lines to create this portrait. He layered one colour on top of the other and it seems he commenced with a green undertone.  The secret to the vibrancy of this painting is the contrast between the warm colours such as red and orange in the face and the green throughout the painting.

Modigliani’s has stripped the initial drawing down to the bare essentials yet the personality of the sitter still shows.   Perhaps he was our first minimalist.  His portraits show the sitters with a mask-like appearance, distinctive almond eyes, pursed mouths, twisted noses, and elongated necks similar to African tribal masks.

Why should we care?

Modigliani despised his academic training and the art establishment of the time.  To go against the bourgeois, he developed his own unique style, one that could not be adequately categorized with other artists.  Modigliani lived a life of debauchery and rebelliousness.  His rebelliousness and use of hashish and absinthe created the genesis of Modigliani’s style which we enjoy so much today.

Where can I find more paintings like this?

It has been said that Modigliani inspired the paintings of Diego Riviera and Frida Khalo although I was unable to see this link.  It seems Modigliani painted in a unique style which inspired no known artists in Paris in the early 1900s.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the water soluble crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

This was my finished painting.  I will probably revisit this painting to make the brushstrokes much more impressionistic (especially in the background) as Mogdiliani has done.

1210-2016-007

A related post on Modigliani using oil crayons was created on this site some years ago.

Image of the original Modigliani painting accessed 01/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Toulouse Lautrec In Bed the Kiss

1210-2016-003

What is it?

Painting In Bed the Kiss, 1892 by French painter, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

How was it done?

Toulouse-Lautrec, despite being a dwarf, was a physical and athletic person who enjoyed horse riding in his youth .  He gave this up to focus on art and the sinuous lines in this painting show his physical energy transposed into his art.

The artist used a brilliant colour scheme with shades of red and yellow subdued by grey, green and blue in this painting.  He uses dabs and quick strokes of paint in the late stages of the painting.  This technique shows an influence of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism.

Why should we care?

As a dwarf and known party animal, Toulouse-Lautrec was able to disappear into the crowd to observe and sketch people he found interesting.  These people were usually outsiders living on the margins of society and he considered them his equals.  Thankfully, Toulouse-Lautrec became a visual historian.  With his paintings, he preserved the swirl of energy, mix of classes and cultures and the lows and highs of urban life in Paris in the 19th century.

Where can I find more paintings like this?

Similarities can be seen in the work of Henri Matisse, particularly in this portrait of “The Young Sailor II“,  1906.  Here the colours are bright and contrasting and there is a sharp edge and flatness to the figure.  A playfulness similar to the cabaret work of Toulouse-Lautrec is evident.

The artist was influenced by Japonisme particularly the woodcuts of Katsushika Hokusai and the Japanese style of the ukiyo-e prints.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

If you wish to create this painting at home, it helps to remember there can be no mistakes.  Everything ends up as it should be. Otherwise, you may prefer to copy Toulouse-Lautrec’s playful cabaret works as a fun exercise. Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • 3 soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figures on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

Photo accessed 28/08/2016.