20 famous paintings for you to copy…

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There is much to be learned from copying paintings you like.  You have a head start with your painting because artistic decisions have already been made for you.  The colours, subject, format, composition have already been decided.  Without you realizing it, everything you learn by copying the great masters, will reflect in your future paintings.

Here they are! All of these famous works can be copied using my tutorials.  Can you recognize them?  Just click the links listed in order below to find your favourite. Go ahead, have some fun painting.  You deserve it!

PS If you choose to sign your work, it is important to acknowledge the original artist.  For example, “Christine S after Monet.”

Matisse “Basket With Oranges”

Edvard Munch “Girls on a Bridge”

Emil Nolde “Windmill”

Franz Marc “Horse in Landscape”

Pablo Picasso “Le Rêve (The Dream)

Milton Avery “Seated Woman in Blue”

Gabrielle Munter “Yavlensky and Verevkin”

Gustav Klimt “Mother with Child”

Wassily Kandinsky “Houses in Munich”

Pablo Picasso “Girl with a Dove”

Vincent van Gogh “The Starry Night”

André Derain “Big Ben”

Gustav Klimt “The Kiss”

Alexj Jawlensky “Girl with Peonies”

Paul Klee “Chosen Site”

Toulouse Lautrec “In Bed the Kiss”

Edvard Munch “Madonna”

Amadeo Modgiliani “Woman with Black Cravat”

Egon Schiele “Ceramics”

Claude Monet, “Les Nympheas” 

Friedensreich Hundertwasser “Man Find in Zahala” (cropped)

Original artwork by Christine Stoner ©
Interesting Instagram: christine_stoner21

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Copy Famous Portraits in Reverse – Alexj von Jawlensky

Jawlewnsy Young Girl with Peonies

What is it?

Painting “Young Girl with Peonies” by Alexj von Jawlensky

Image accessed 1/03/2018

In this painting I have reversed the colours by using their opposites on the colour wheel below.

color-wheel

 

How was this painting done?

German expressionist painters typically distorted colour, scale and space to convey their subjective feelings about what they saw. However, war scarred many of these artists for good. As a result, from 1915 onwards, German expressionism became a bitter protest movement as well as a style of modern art.

Exaggeration or distortion of lines, forms, and colours were just some of the techniques used by expressionists to convey their emotions, anxieties or neuroses.

Jawlensky combined elements of Russian icon painting and peasant art with the strong colours and outlines of the Fauves to create a distinctive, mystical expressionism.  He did, however, retain his typical Russian melancholy.

Why should we care?

Jawlensky can teach us a lot about the value of collaborating and working with our art buddies.

Between 1908 and 1910, Jawlensky spent summers in the Bavarian Alps with painters, Marianne von Werefkin, Gabrielle Munter and Wassily Kandinsky.  Through painting landscapes of their mountainous surroundings, they experimented with one another’s techniques and discussed many topics including art history.  After this time, Jawlewnsky turned increasingly to the expressive use of colour and form alone in his portraits. Jawlensky’s further collaborations with other artists who broke away from The New Artists’ Society in Munich went on to form the famous Der Blaue Reiter Group.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

“Portrait of Madame Matisse” (Green Stripe)”, 1905.  This work shows the bright colours   typical of The Fauves which influenced Jawlensky greatly.  Both Matisse and Jawlensky used colour to convey emotion.  Colour is the most significant element and focus of  “Young Girl with Peonies” (above) and “Portrait of Madame Matisse (Green Stripe).”

“Portrait of Marianne von Werefkin”, 1909, Gabrielle Munter.  Here, Munter has simplified the form and created clear colour contrasts similar to the technique applied in “Jawlensky’s “Girl with Peonies” (above).

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out”, have fun and recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two but don’t be concerned if  completing the painting over two days.
  • Tips on the Process
  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • paint in the background first
  • draw your painting with a small brush using a watery blend of blue.
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • The painting will not look great at the initial stages, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

If you would rather not use a grid for the drawing,  you may wish to copy from the first image below using a fine brush.

Go ahead!  Save yourself money by painting your own amazing pieces for your home.  You and your friends will be amazed at what you have achieved!

 

JawlenskyWalnut

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courage – Daily Therapy

Jan 2018

“It is what we make out of what we have, not what we are given, that separates one person from another.”  Nelson Mandela

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Copy Famous Paintings – Emil Nolde

emil-nolde

What is it?

A painting titled Windmill”, 1924 by German artist, Emil Nolde

How was this painting done?

Nolde has gone out on a limb with this painting.  Most artists shy away from using black as it is sometimes believed to be a dead colour.  Green can also be a difficult colour to mix and so easily appear garish by taking over the painting.

Here the artist has successfully used these two controversial colours.  The black is mixed with a very small amount of green to make a “living black”.  Nolde has mixed a tertiary green and toned it down by placing it directly beside its almost complementary colour, orange.  His placement of these two colours has created energy and vibrancy resulting in a painting that literally jumps off the canvas.

Nolde was a true artist who communicated immediately with his vision, his impulses and his influences. He gave this ordinary scene a disturbing presence.

Why should we care?

Nolde was one of the strongest and most independent of the German Expressionists and a member of the Dresden-based group known as Die Brücke. He was also a supporter of the Nazi party from the early 1920s, having become a member of its Danish section.

Adolf Hitler rejected all forms of modernism as “degenerate art“, and the Nazi regime officially condemned Nolde’s work.  Until that time, he had been held in great prestige in Germany.  A total of 1,052 of Nolde’s paintings were removed from museums, more than those of any other artist.  Some were included in the Degenerate Art exhibition of 1937, despite Nolde’s protests.

Nolde was not allowed to paint, even in private, after 1941.  As a matter of necessity, and in secret, he painted hundreds of watercolours in this time, which he hid.  Nolde called them the “Unpainted Pictures”.  The painter, although deprived of his livelihood as an artist, was loyal to the Nazi cause to the bitter end.  Nolde claimed his troubles were based on a “misunderstanding” and Hitler was simply misled by those around him in rejecting Nolde’s art.

Nolde was not only passionate about his painting, he was also loyal and forgiving, values we all aspire to today.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Similarities can be seen inWindmill”, 1909 by Erich Heckel 

In this painting, fellow Die Brücke member, Heckel shows a similar use of colour although the brush strokes are much bolder and more like mark making.  Unlike Nolde, the artist has left areas of the canvas uncovered.   

And another expressionist work, “Spring Landscape at the Red House”, 1935 by Edvard Munch

In this landscape, Munch, like Nolde, has used intense colours, semi-abstraction and a mysterious, open-ended theme.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself. There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the colour you put down

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing with the crayon first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy onto good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

 

0701-2017-005

0802 2017 001.JPG

IMG_0122

The original image is copyrighted and was accessed on 03/02/2017 from   http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/detail.php?ID=104236  It is used here for educational purposes only.

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

 

 

Copy Famous Paintings – Franz Marc

franz-marc

What is it?

A painting, Horse in a Landscape”, 1910 by Franz Marc

How  was this painting done?

This painting was completed in oils on canvas.  ‘Horse In Landscape” is an early work where Marc (inspired by Wassily Kandinsky) experiments with colour.   Here we see a red horse with a blue mane and tail looking over a landscape defined by yellow, red, green and blue areas. The horse is standing with its back to the observer, so is seen from viewers’ eyes.

Marc took a Cubist approach in the display and creation of the animals he painted.   He approached the painting simply by focusing on the animal and raw emotion rather than drawing in from external factors like background. Rendering the subject realistically was not Marc’s concern.

Why should we care?

When Marc was 20 years old he began to study at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich and eventually became a key figure in the German Expressionist movement.  Marc created art that increasingly, was stark and abstract in nature.  At age 34 and having been drafted into the army to fight in WWI, Marc enjoyed painting tarpaulins for military camouflage. Sadly, Marc was killed by a shell splinter in 1916.

As a young man whose life was lost needlessly in war, we honour Franz Marc and can only imagine what paintings he may have produced had he lived to old age.  The shadow of lives lost in war hovers over us still and we are indebted to artists like Marc. His paintings, particularly the brushstrokes, subject matter. abstraction and colour have left timeless memories for us to enjoy.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

In “Promenade”, 1913 and Tightrope Walker”, 1914 by August Macke we see a similar blend of Cubism, colour, distortion and form used to express emotions and feelings. 

Robert Delaunay, whose use of colour, design,  Futurist  and Cubist methods was also a major influence on Marc’s work.  This can be seen in The Rainbow”, 1913.  Delaunay makes a clear statement by using colour and form to describe his joy upon seeing a rainbow.  His primary concern is with expressing emotion, feelings and mood.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself. There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the colour you put down

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing with the crayon first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

0801-2016-0140701-2016-001

 

Franz Marc

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

 

 

Copy Famous Paintings – Gabrielle Münter

gabrielle-munter-yavlensky-and-verevkin-1908

What is it?

A painting,“Yavlensky and Verevkin”, 1908 by German artist, Gabrielle Münter

How  was this painting done?

This painting has color as the star of the show.  Münter uses a number of very unusual, carefully mixed, tertiary blues, greens, yellows, and pinks. The composition and forms are very flat and the colors are muted and suggestive. The figures are as abstract as the landscape with the brightly coloured hat of the lady sitting centrally within a triangle of background clouds. The impression is one of a summer’s day in the mountains.

Even though Münter’s palette was bright, great sadness is reflected in her paintings.  Münter studied with the Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky and the relationship progressed from friendship to love affair. Kandinsky was married for fifteen years while he was in a relationship with Münter. Later and with WWI imminent,  Kandinsky fled to Russia and  married a recent acquaintance in Moscow.  These events affected Münter’s art.

Why should we care?

Münter had a life of mixed blessings.  Sadly, both her parents died before she turned 21.  To  Münter’s benefit, she was left with a substantial inheritance and was then able to devote her life to painting.  The artist was repeatedly refused enrollment in the German art academies because of her gender.

With persistence, passion and the financial security of her inheritance, Münter was eventually able to learn from the best teachers.  Münter proved she was able to paint as well as the men in the Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group of which she was a member.

Münter is a great example to us all.  With persistence, passion and despite the ups and downs of life, she achieved what seemed impossible for a woman at the time.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Münter’s paintings show the influence of Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin and Henri Matisse.  Similarities can also be seen in “Blauer Berg”, 1910 and “Landscaftstudie – Dorfstrasse”, 1908 by Alexej von Jawlensky.  The strong influence of Russian artists and Der Blaue Reiter members, von Jawlensky and Kandinsky is evident in Münter paintings done in the early 1900s.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

1212-2016-0111212-2016-038

Original image from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/gabrielemunter.php

If you would like to receive a welcome quarterly gem in your inbox then please subscribe to my blog.  Once every three months, I email the most popular post of drawings and quotes to my subscribers.  Strangely and coincidentally, the post connects to them and their life situation at that time.  

Subscribe to this blog at the bottom right of the home page.  

Copy Famous Paintings – Wassily Kandinsky

houses-in-munich-kandinsky

What is it?

A painting, “Houses in Munich“, 1908 by Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky

How was this painting done?

Kandinsky blocked in the larger areas in bright colours and then touched up these areas with different tones of those same colours at the end.  The result is a patchwork of bright colours which both convey the emotions of the artist and make a picture.

The most striking effect in this painting is the orange sky which gives the feeling of a sunset throwing reflected light on the brightened buildings.   Kandinsky paints the foreground in warm colours to move the cool coloured buildings behind it.

Why Should We Care?

Kandinsky set out to convey universal human emotions and ideas by using blocks of vibrant colour.  His work became more and more abstract in order to transcend cultural and physical boundaries.

Kandinsky believed musicians could evoke images in listeners’ minds merely with sounds.  He also believed the reverse, that artists could evoke sounds and emotions in the viewers’ minds with images and colour. This was new and controversial thinking at the time and resulted in some scratching their head in bewilderment.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Similarities can be seen in Mont St Victoire, 1895 by Paul Cezanne.

Cezanne has divided the scene into blocks of colour although not quite as bright as the Kandinsky  painting above. Houses in Munich”  which was done 13 years later and is much more adventurous with colour.

American artist Hans Hoffman seems to have drawn heavily from Kandinsky’s early work and this can be seen in “Equipoise”, 1958.  Large blocks of colour push and pull the warm colours forward while the cooler colours recede giving depth to the painting.  The result is a confusion of shapes moving in space.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

2511-2016-0052311-2016-018

I also posted on how to paint watercolours to music after Wassily Kandinsky some years ago.

Image of original from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/work-85.php, accessed 13/11/2016