Copy Famous Paintings – Gabrielle Münter

gabrielle-munter-yavlensky-and-verevkin-1908

What is it?

A painting,“Yavlensky and Verevkin”, 1908 by German artist, Gabrielle Münter

How  was this painting done?

This painting has color as the star of the show.  Münter uses a number of very unusual, carefully mixed, tertiary blues, greens, yellows, and pinks. The composition and forms are very flat and the colors are muted and suggestive. The figures are as abstract as the landscape with the brightly coloured hat of the lady sitting centrally within a triangle of background clouds. The impression is one of a summer’s day in the mountains.

Even though Münter’s palette was bright, great sadness is reflected in her paintings.  Münter studied with the Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky and the relationship progressed from friendship to love affair. Kandinsky was married for fifteen years while he was in a relationship with Münter. Later and with WWI imminent,  Kandinsky fled to Russia and  married a recent acquaintance in Moscow.  These events affected Münter’s art.

Why should we care?

Münter had a life of mixed blessings.  Sadly, both her parents died before she turned 21.  To  Münter’s benefit, she was left with a substantial inheritance and was then able to devote her life to painting.  The artist was repeatedly refused enrollment in the German art academies because of her gender.

With persistence, passion and the financial security of her inheritance, Münter was eventually able to learn from the best teachers.  Münter proved she was able to paint as well as the men in the Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group of which she was a member.

Münter is a great example to us all.  With persistence, passion and despite the ups and downs of life, she achieved what seemed impossible for a woman at the time.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Münter’s paintings show the influence of Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin and Henri Matisse.  Similarities can also be seen in “Blauer Berg”, 1910 and “Landscaftstudie – Dorfstrasse”, 1908 by Alexej von Jawlensky.  The strong influence of Russian artists and Der Blaue Reiter members, von Jawlensky and Kandinsky is evident in Münter paintings done in the early 1900s.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

1212-2016-0111212-2016-038

Original image from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/gabrielemunter.php

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Copy Famous Paintings – Henri Matisse

matisse-basket-with-oranges

What is it?

A still-life painting, Basket With Oranges, 1913 by Henri Matisse.

How was this painting done?

Matisse has been very skillful in his use of colour and decoration here.  Notice how each colour used is distributed in various amounts throughout the painting.  This ties the painting together. The colours jump across the picture and “talk to each other” creating unity and harmony.  Colour harmony is one of the reasons this still life is so eye catching.

Matisse has used flatness most effectively in “Basket With Oranges.”  The objects are not three dimensional, nor did Matisse intend them to be.  In doing so, he shows off what a painting can be, not what the items actually are.  Matisse reminds us that we are viewing a work of art which has called attention to itself as a painting, not as a group of objects.

Why should we care?

Matisse visited Morocco in 1912, the year before this painting was done. After that, everything changed for Matisse and for us.

Morocco meant extravagance of colour, pattern and light.  Dizzying arrangements of carpet, textiles and wallpaper emphasized pattern and color. Decoration in Morocco was like no other.  It was not secondary to an image; it was the principal subject.

In “Basket With Oranges”,  Matisse has successfully separated decorative art and the intellectual obligations of easel painting.  He does not intend any other aim than beauty, pleasure and delight of the senses.

Matisse’s trip to Morocco in 1912 resulted in decorative pictures full of joy and positivity. His subsequent paintings featured strong vibrant colours, patterns and light.  Matisse developed a style that is everlasting.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Paintings by Raoul Dufy done 15 years later can be seen with Matisse’s influence of colour, decoration and light.  These includeOpen Window Nice“, 1928 and Interior With Open Windows“, 1928.

It may be said that Cezanne was influenced by Paul Gauguin.  This can be seen in some of Gauguin’s paintings done in the vibrant, colourful culture of Tahiti.  A good example is The Seed of the Areoi“,  which was painted in 1892, 21 years earlier than “Basket With Oranges.”

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

Original image from https://www.wikiart.org/en/henri-matisse/basket-with-oranges-1913 accessed 28/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Wassily Kandinsky

houses-in-munich-kandinsky

What is it?

A painting, “Houses in Munich“, 1908 by Russian artist, Wassily Kandinsky

How was this painting done?

Kandinsky blocked in the larger areas in bright colours and then touched up these areas with different tones of those same colours at the end.  The result is a patchwork of bright colours which both convey the emotions of the artist and make a picture.

The most striking effect in this painting is the orange sky which gives the feeling of a sunset throwing reflected light on the brightened buildings.   Kandinsky paints the foreground in warm colours to move the cool coloured buildings behind it.

Why Should We Care?

Kandinsky set out to convey universal human emotions and ideas by using blocks of vibrant colour.  His work became more and more abstract in order to transcend cultural and physical boundaries.

Kandinsky believed musicians could evoke images in listeners’ minds merely with sounds.  He also believed the reverse, that artists could evoke sounds and emotions in the viewers’ minds with images and colour. This was new and controversial thinking at the time and resulted in some scratching their head in bewilderment.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Similarities can be seen in Mont St Victoire, 1895 by Paul Cezanne.

Cezanne has divided the scene into blocks of colour although not quite as bright as the Kandinsky  painting above. Houses in Munich”  which was done 13 years later and is much more adventurous with colour.

American artist Hans Hoffman seems to have drawn heavily from Kandinsky’s early work and this can be seen in “Equipoise”, 1958.  Large blocks of colour push and pull the warm colours forward while the cooler colours recede giving depth to the painting.  The result is a confusion of shapes moving in space.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

2511-2016-0052311-2016-018

I also posted on how to paint watercolours to music after Wassily Kandinsky some years ago.

Image of original from http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/work-85.php, accessed 13/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Egon Schiele

egon-schiele-ceramics

What is it?

Painting Ceramics“, 1918 by Austrian artist, Egon Schiele.

How was this painting done?

Schiele did this painting on paper with watercolours.  He used a black crayon to draw the outline of the objects.  This is a simple painting done in a loose and organic style.   Schiele restricted his colours and kept the painting uncluttered with a plain background which was typical of his style.  The result is an entirely pleasing composition of “less being more.”

Why Should We Care?

Schiele is a great example of an artist who followed his passion and was not molded by beliefs of what art should be as thought by others.

Schiele, Gustav Klimt and others chose to break away from the Academie of Fine Arts and the Kunstlerhaus  in 1897 and form the Vienna Secessionists.

This enabled Schiele the freedom to create  the raw, direct,  erotic and deeply psychological paintings he preferred. His striking sinuous lines, use of colour and method of leaving a drawing or painting unfinished had not been seen before.  We are therefore, the beneficiaries of Schiele’s rebelliousness.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

The patterning on the vases in Schiele’s “Ceramics”, although done much later, reflects the influence of Japanese art after the influx of Japanese goods and  prints flooded Europe from 1853.

Vincent van Gogh’s Still Life With Roses and Anemones.”, 1890 and “Vase with Daisies and Poppies”, 1890 also reflect the influence  of Japonisme.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured watercolour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

You can also check out how to create a naive landscape after Schiele using watercolours which I posted some time ago.  Related posts after Klimt, cropped versions of “The Kiss” and Mother and Childalso appear in this category.

Image from https://www.wikiart.org/en/egon-schiele/ceramics-1918, accessed 13/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Milton Avery

milton-avery-large-seated-woman-in-blue

What is It?

Painting Seated Woman in Blue“, by Milton AveryDate not known.

How was this painting done?

Milton Avery has creatively used simplification in his drawing of the furniture and model. The artist has combined his drawing with magical sparks of colour to create a jigsaw of shapes.  These shapes create a patchwork of colour showing the influence of American Abstraction.  The artist has been bold.  He has taken risks and the result is a poetic and powerful representation of domesticity.

Why Should We Care?

Milton Avery is a great example of a person who created art despite many setbacks.  Whilst working at night in a factory from the age of 15 and having the sole responsibility of his nine female relatives, he painted during the day.  He attended weekend art classes at the Art Students League and there, after many years without recognition, was discovered by a wealthy art financier. Avery created his own style and stayed with it even though his work was considered too abstract until much later in his life.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Similarities to Avery’s colourful abstractions of everyday life can be seen inWoman on a Terrace“,  1907 by Henri Matisse.

French Fauvism and German Expressionism influenced the style of Avery’s early work.   Similarities to his bold and creative use of drawing and color can be seen inMarzella“, 1909-10 by German artist, Ludwig Kirchner

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

1111-2016-0071111-2016-009

Photo from https://www.reproduction-gallery.com/oil-painting/1341213288/seated-woman-in-blue-by-milton-avery/ accessed 11/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Pablo Picasso

picasso-the-dream

What is It?

“Le Rêve” (The Dream), Oil painting, 1932 by Pablo Picasso

How was this painting done?

In this painting, Picasso creates a distorted depiction, with very simplified outlines and contrasting colors resembling early Fauvism. Picasso takes the human form of his young mistress and translates it into colours and shapes.  He uses intense colours like the sun,  bright red lipstick and soft colours of the body to depict her sensuality.  The model’s face shows emotions of peace and tranquility.  The artist uses  a darker harlequin pattern in the background.  Some say this could be a metaphor for Picasso’s belief in himself as a trickster or harlequin.

Why Should We Care?

Pablo Picasso and his friend Georges Braque invented Cubism and a new way of seeing by painting the subject from multiple viewpoints.  .

Picasso painted what he wanted, he broke away from tradition by being himself and showing his emotions. Without Pablo Picasso and his controversial artworks, Modern Art and the world would not be what they are today.  How we see art has completely changed, thanks to the genius of Picasso.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Similarities in subject matter and use of bright colours can be found in the early abstractions of Matisse such as in his 1905 painting titled,  Bonheur de Vivre, or the “Joy of Life.and “Portrait of Lydia Delectorskaya“, 1947.

Picasso’s early work “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907 shows the influence of African art and a subsequent distortion of the face.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

0711-2016-0041011-2016-004

Image from http://www.pablopicasso.org/the-dream.jsp accessed 09/11/2016

Copy Famous Paintings – Vincent van Gogh

van_gogh_-_starry_night_-_google_art_project

What is it?

The Starry Night“, 1889 by Vincent Van Gogh

How was this painting done?

Van Gogh uses a low eye level as a compositional device to display one of the most dramatic skies in the history of painting. The low eye level divides this painting into two symbolic areas:

The Heavenly Sky – the large area above the eye level creates the space that is needed to display the convulsive power of a starlit heaven.  Van Gogh does this by surrounding the night stars in an orb of light.

The Humble Town – the small area below the eye level compresses the town into a respectful position at the bottom of the picture.  The houses in the distance are lit up in a warm glow of artificial light.

Why Should We Care?

Vincent van Gogh lived more than 115 years ago, and yet his everlasting artwork is still influencing the way we view beauty, persona, individuality, and style in art. Van Gogh found the sacred in the common and his unique life has inspired millions to become active in art. Artists continue to copy the style Van Gogh created over one hundred years ago.

Where can I find more paintings like it?

Similarities can be seen in the work of Claude Monet, especially “Impression, Sunrise“, 1872 and Henri Matisse’s Luxe, Calme et Volupté, 1904.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

2910 2016 003.JPG

2910-2016-002

I made a post after Vincent van Gogh on this site some years ago and it is also suitable for beginners.

Image from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Starry_Night, accessed 29/10/2016